Fun in Yoyogi Park


Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

This guy below was busting his best moves all by himself in Yoyogi, something considered perfectly acceptable.
When you live in a country expecting complete conformity, the only acceptable place to be yourself is Yoyogi Park on a Sunday afternoon.

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

NOTICE SHE HAS HER PANTS ON INCORRECTLY – THEY ARE BACKWARDS!!!

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

Japanese Culture Yoyogi Park, Tokyo, Japan

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Subway Scenes from Tokyo, Japan


Some of my best moments were spent in subways in Japan. I found it the singular most fascinating place to people watch and come to understand the idiosyncrasies that typify the Japanese. There are so many rules both spoken and others that were merely social norms, it was inevitable I broke them. And believe me, I probably broke all of them. Some of them are: do not talk on the train, do not put makeup on, do not eat, do not drink, and especially, never, ever make eye contact with anyone else. They hate that!

However, as a foreigner living there I was something of a curiosity to them and they really wanted to stare. Staring is considered sooooo rude in their culture though. One of my favorite games was watching them watching me trying not to get caught at it. The best way to do this was for me to face the windows as if looking outside the train. The windows are reflective though so I could see them very well. If I turned around to look, they would always be looking away. Facing the window though…..well…you get the idea.

Another anomaly I would experience was the occasional prejudice against me as an American. I didn’t take it personally. It’s just the way they are sometimes. Most often that meant no one would sit next to me on the train. Frankly, I loved and exploited this when it would happen. The train could be wall to wall with riders but no one would sit next to me. What a convenient place to set my purse and belongings! This never bothered me. Moreover, mothers with children would usually have one of two reactions to me getting on the train. They would either take their children and go as far away as they could from me, or, conversely, push their children at me while saying “Engrish, Engrish….practice Engrish.” This always brought a smile to my face.

Another peccadillo of Japanese culture is the premise of pretending to sleep. This is an extremely common and socially acceptable way to avoid having to look at or talk to anyone else on the train. One out of three riders would pretend to sleep. The instant the train stopped at their stop though, they jumped up and were off the train.

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

A typical rider gets on the train.

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

And instantly pretends to be asleep so as not to engage anyone else.

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

This was a humorous solution I recently found to the swaying issue when pretending to sleep on the train.

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

This lady was so elegant in her kimono.

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

This lady is wearing something called a Yukuta. It’s like a kimono but less expensive and more every day wear.

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

This handsome fellow is wearing “geta” on his feet. These are the traditional wooden sandals they wear.

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

This was an ad inside the train.

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

Also an advertisement.

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

Main entrance to Ebisu Station in Roppongi, Tokyo, Japan.

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

Sign for Ebisu Station in Roppongi, Tokyo, Japan.

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

Looking out the window onto a typical Japanese street scene.

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

Inside a station.

`Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

I just really dug the pattern as it curved to the right

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan

Subways and Trains, Tokyo, Japan